Following the passing an APMG/EXIN exam in IT service management (based on ITIL), some people will wear a metal pin on their shirt or jacket. This badge, provided by the ITSMF with basic gold colour is set in the form of the ITIL-logo. The ITIL pins consist of a small, diamond-like structure. The meaning and the shape of the diamond is meant to depict coherence in the IT industry (infrastructure as well). The four corners of the pin symbolise service support, service delivery, infrastructure management and IT management.
The ‘Information Technology Infrastructure Library (ITIL)’ is a set of ITSM practices utilized by some of the most high-profile organizations in the world, including HSBC, IBM and even NASA. Originally released as a series of books, ITIL was designed to standardize the procedures for good IT management, helping businesses to avoid the most common pitfalls in order to deliver the best quality services possible.
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ICT technical support is the specialist technical function for infrastructure within ICT. Primarily as a support to other processes, both in infrastructure management and service management, technical support provides a number of specialist functions: research and evaluation, market intelligence (particularly for design and planning and capacity management), proof of concept and pilot engineering, specialist technical expertise (particularly to operations and problem management), creation of documentation (perhaps for the operational documentation library or known error database). There are different levels of support under the ITIL structure, these being primary support level, secondary support level and tertiary support level, higher-level administrators being responsible for support at primary level.
A former IT executive with PepsiCo, Peter McGarahan is a connoisseur of IT consultation. With his firm, McGarahan & Associates, Peter has a proven track record of assisting companies in achieving excellence in service and support. Peter is recognized internationally as a phenomenal motivational and keynote speaker, and as an engaging and edifying writer in the IT Service Management field.

Have a group of several students in Dallas needing ITIL Certification training on the same topics? Then onsite ITIL Certification training is a perfect option for you. We'll come onsite to your office in Dallas, so you don't have to travel. You'll be able to fully customize a ITIL Certification course with topics to fit your needs. Lastly, you'll save per employee versus our public classes.
Malcom Fry’s career in IT began in 1967, and since then he has gained a wealth of knowledge and experience in all aspects of ITIL strategy through developmental, operational and management roles for retail, manufacturing, oil, and pharmaceutical organizations. The author of five best-selling books on IT service and support, he is recognized worldwide as one of the most influential authorities in help desk and IT Service Management. Malcolm has become highly sought out by large organizations as an innovative and informative strategic consultant.
All of our courseware is reviewed multiple times a year to ensure it's up to date, in line with best practice standards, and effective! We incorporate feedback from students to constantly improve our course books, in-class activities, and (sorry) homework. The goal is to provide you with the tools to not only get you through class and pass the exam, but also to have a reliable reference when you get back to the office.
The ITIL Practitioner is considered the next step in the ITIL progression after achieving the ITIL Foundation (which is a prerequisite). It emphasizes the ability to adopt, adapt and apply ITIL concepts in an organization. Although the Practitioner certification is not required for upper-level ITIL credentials, achieving Practitioner certification provides three credits toward ITIL Expert certification. You can prepare for the Practitioner exam through self-study, in-person classroom learning or online and distance learning options. The Practitioner exam is 40 multiple-choice questions and requires a minimum score of 70 percent, or 28 correct answers,  to pass.
ITIL Intermediate (Lifecycle Stream): Addresses aspects of ITIL from a holistic, lifecycle perspective. Lifecycle may be more suited to those with managerial responsibility looking at the overall IT Service Management picture. The Service Strategy course in particular is very much rooted in the broader corporate strategy and governance environment.
ITIL Intermediate Level, which scores a candidate with 15 or 16 credits, is open to those who have already passed the ITIL Foundation exam and have completed an accredited training course. The intermediate level includes two paths: Service Lifecycle, with five examinations (Service Strategy, Service Design, Service Transition, Service Operation, and Continual Service Improvement); and Service Capability, with four examinations (Planning Protection and Optimization, Release Control and Validation, Operational Support and Analysis, and Service Offerings and Agreements).

Continuous Service Improvement: This phase defines new requirements for the preceding phases of ITIL based on operational feedback and service levels. It helps to ensure that policies and procedures are followed, that service level agreements are met and that operational lessons learned are incorporated into existing and future service refinements.
IT Financial Management comprises the discipline of ensuring the IT infrastructure is obtained at the most effective price (which does not necessarily mean cheapest) and calculating the cost of providing IT services so an organization can understand the costs of its IT services. These costs may then be recovered from the customer of the service. This is the second component of the service delivery process.

ITIL 2007 edition (previously known as ITIL Version 3) is an extension of ITIL Version 2 and fully replaced it following the completion of the withdrawal period on 30 June 2011.[21] ITIL 2007 provides a more holistic perspective on the full life cycle of services, covering the entire IT organization and all supporting components needed to deliver services to the customer, whereas ITIL Version 2 focused on specific activities directly related to service delivery and support. Most of the ITIL Version 2 activities remained untouched in 2007, but some significant changes in terminology were introduced in order to facilitate the expansion.
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