We’ve already discussed why ITIL is critical in today’s IT environment, and why it’s still widely adopted among many IT organizations of all sizes. For these reasons, it’s important that employees within these organizations have a deep understanding of ITIL’s foundations in order to achieve maximum benefits from its implementation. Knowledge and mastery of ITIL is so important in fact, that many organizations are even investing in certification sponsorship programs to help employees get ITIL certified.
John Towsley’s extensive experience in the IT education marketplace has made him a perfect fit for teaching the ITIL Foundation Certification. He is of course ITIL certified himself, and knows exactly what it takes to find success in the IT Service Management field. Currently the CEO for B Wyze Holdings Inc., John’s experience and knowledge is invaluable. In the past, John established and operated his own multi-site IT education & consulting business in Canada and the US, and he brings this experience to you through the incredible content he provides for the Thought Rock Library.

Following the passing an APMG/EXIN exam in IT service management (based on ITIL), some people will wear a metal pin on their shirt or jacket. This badge, provided by the ITSMF with basic gold colour is set in the form of the ITIL-logo. The ITIL pins consist of a small, diamond-like structure. The meaning and the shape of the diamond is meant to depict coherence in the IT industry (infrastructure as well). The four corners of the pin symbolise service support, service delivery, infrastructure management and IT management.
The aim of the ITIL service lifecycle is to provide best practices for IT service management (ITSM). It focuses on helping align the needs of an organization with IT services. The ITIL lifecycle consists of service strategy, service design, service transition, and service operation, along with continual service improvement throughout the process. The ITIL processes, procedures, responsibilities, and specifications are not specific to an organization like those of the SDLC, rather they can be practically applied to establish integration with the company’s IT strategy, providing value and maintaining competency. Essentially, it is a baseline from which the organization can plan, implement, monitor, and measure its processes.
A basic goal of security management is to ensure adequate information security. The primary goal of information security, in turn, is to protect information assets against risks, and thus to maintain their value to the organization. This is commonly expressed in terms of ensuring their confidentiality, integrity and availability, along with related properties or goals such as authenticity, accountability, non-repudiation and reliability.
Service-level management provides for continual identification, monitoring and review of the levels of IT services specified in the service-level agreements (SLAs). Service-level management ensures that arrangements are in place with internal IT support-providers and external suppliers in the form of operational level agreements (OLAs) and underpinning contracts (UCs), respectively. The process involves assessing the impact of change on service quality and SLAs. The service-level management process is in close relation with the operational processes to control their activities. The central role of service-level management makes it the natural place for metrics to be established and monitored against a benchmark.
The ‘Information Technology Infrastructure Library’ is a set of best practices for creating and improving an ITSM process. It is designed to help businesses manage risks, strengthen customer relations, establish cost-effective practices and build stable IT environments for growth, scale and change. In short, an ITIL Practitioner is an expert in continually shaping IT service development processes.
The great thing about being knowledgeable in such a broad, complex framework like ITIL is that your understanding of the inner-workings of the entire IT infrastructure increases and you gain more flexibility in your ability to wear many hats, making you more valuable to the organization. The higher your certification level is, the more roles you will be qualified to take on. Not satisfied working in IT service operations? Try your hand as a service strategy manager. The possibilities are wide and there are many different job roles to choose from.

If you work in IT, you’ve likely heard of or worked with ITIL. Perhaps you’ve even considered pursuing ITIL certifications. But is the investment worth the return? We’re taking a look at the cost of ITIL certifications at various levels and the benefits you can expect, so you can decide whether it’s an appropriate investment for you and your business.
The good news about ITIL certification is that it is a valuable skill for almost any IT professional, from system administrators to chief information officers (CIOs). Many large companies have dedicated ITIL coaches or mentors who help shepherd projects through the various steps of the ITIL framework. These ITIL gurus have a wide understanding of the IT landscape and can usually spot trouble with a service design document or implementation plan in a matter of minutes.
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