The aim of the ITIL service lifecycle is to provide best practices for IT service management (ITSM). It focuses on helping align the needs of an organization with IT services. The ITIL lifecycle consists of service strategy, service design, service transition, and service operation, along with continual service improvement throughout the process. The ITIL processes, procedures, responsibilities, and specifications are not specific to an organization like those of the SDLC, rather they can be practically applied to establish integration with the company’s IT strategy, providing value and maintaining competency. Essentially, it is a baseline from which the organization can plan, implement, monitor, and measure its processes.

You have to submit your application to become a Master, and if your application is accepted, you will be required to submit a proposal. If this is successful, you will be required to submit a work package. The final stage of the Master scheme consists of an interview with a panel of assessors and, if successful, you will be granted ITIL Master certification.
The service desk functions are the single contact-point for end-users' incidents. Its first function is always to document ("create") an incident. If there is a direct solution, it attempts to resolve the incident at the first level. If the service desk cannot solve the incident then it is passed to a 2nd/3rd level group within the incident management system. Incidents can initiate a chain of processes: incident management, problem management, change management, release management and configuration management. This chain of processes is tracked using the configuration management database (CMDB), - ITIL refers to configuration management system (CMS), which records each process, and creates output documents for traceability (quality management). Note - CMDB/CMS does not have to be a single database. The solution can be Federated.
Service-level management provides for continual identification, monitoring and review of the levels of IT services specified in the service-level agreements (SLAs). Service-level management ensures that arrangements are in place with internal IT support-providers and external suppliers in the form of operational level agreements (OLAs) and underpinning contracts (UCs), respectively. The process involves assessing the impact of change on service quality and SLAs. The service-level management process is in close relation with the operational processes to control their activities. The central role of service-level management makes it the natural place for metrics to be established and monitored against a benchmark.

The ITIL Foundation course is the entry level certification course for IT Service Management Best Practices training in ITIL Basics. This course covers the latest version of core ITIL best practices presented from a lifecycle perspective. The course introduces the principles and core elements of IT service management (ITSM) based on ITIL. ITIL is comprised of five core publications: Service Strategy, Service Design, Service Transition, Service Operations, and Continual Service Improvement, promoting alignment with the business as well as improving operational efficiency.
ITIL 2007 edition (previously known as ITIL Version 3) is an extension of ITIL Version 2 and fully replaced it following the completion of the withdrawal period on 30 June 2011.[21] ITIL 2007 provides a more holistic perspective on the full life cycle of services, covering the entire IT organization and all supporting components needed to deliver services to the customer, whereas ITIL Version 2 focused on specific activities directly related to service delivery and support. Most of the ITIL Version 2 activities remained untouched in 2007, but some significant changes in terminology were introduced in order to facilitate the expansion.
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