Taking this strategy on board offers a number of advantages for businesses. Perhaps most notably, it can cut back on the amount of time and money that gets wasted throughout the service development lifecycle, while also raising the quality of the end-product. This, in turn, can provide a huge boost to customer satisfaction once a service or product is implemented, as well as the morale of staff working on it.
While you can certainly study up or apply ITIL principles and practices in your own company, you can also pursue official ITIL certifications, which indicate familiarity, knowledge, and even mastery of ITIL principles put into practice. Importantly, ITIL certifications are available only to individuals, not to an entire organization. For instance, if a company claims they are ITIL certified, they may in fact comply with a related, but different, standard of the ISO/IEC 20000, or they may simply be promoting any number of employees within the company do hold ITIL certifications.

The Information Technology Infrastructure Library (ITIL) is the most widely adopted framework of best practices for IT Service Management. As an accredited ITIL Training Provider Approved Training Organization (ATO), Learning Tree offers a complete curriculum of courses that help you gain the knowledge and skills required for specific ITIL Certification exams. Each Learning Tree course offers the related exam in class.
Software asset management (SAM) is a primary topic of ITIL Version 2 and is closely associated with the ITIL Application Management function. SAM is the practice of integrating people, processes, and technology to allow software licenses and usage to be systematically tracked, evaluated, and managed. The goal of SAM is to reduce IT expenditures, human resource overhead and risks inherent in owning and managing software assets.
The ITIL certification scheme now offers a modular approach. Each qualification is assigned a credit value; so that upon successful completion of the module, the candidate is rewarded with both a certification and a number of credits. At the lowest level – Foundation – candidates are awarded a certification and two credits. At the Intermediate level, a total of additional 15 credits have to be earned. These credits may be accumulated in either a "Lifecycle" stream[note 1] or a "Capability" stream;[note 2] or combination thereof. Each Lifecycle module and exam is three credits. Each Capability module and corresponding exam is four credits. A candidate wanting to achieve the Expert level will have, among other requirements, to gain the required number of credits (22). That is accomplished with two from Foundations, then at least 15 from Intermediate, and finally five credits from the "Managing Across the Lifecycle" exam. Together, the total of 22 earned credits allows a person to request designation as an ITIL Expert. Advancing from the expert to the master level does not require additional credits, but does require at least five years of IT domain work experience and an extensive usage of ITIL practices.[47]

ITIL Intermediate (Capabilities Stream): Prescriptive modules with detailed views of the inputs, activities, concepts, metrics and outputs of each process, which develops capabilities for best practices of IT processes, rather than just management of them. They are most useful to those who will be taking part in the day-to-day practical activities described within each of the processes:


This is the information managed in the service and any supporting information and knowledge including protect, manage and archive it. Technology is main driver for benefit in service management. This may be artificial intelligence, machine learning, the use of mobile platforms, cloud solutions, collaboration tools, automated testing and operations as well as continuous integration / continuous development / continuous deployment solutions[15].

ITIL Intermediate Level, which scores a candidate with 15 or 16 credits, is open to those who have already passed the ITIL Foundation exam and have completed an accredited training course. The intermediate level includes two paths: Service Lifecycle, with five examinations (Service Strategy, Service Design, Service Transition, Service Operation, and Continual Service Improvement); and Service Capability, with four examinations (Planning Protection and Optimization, Release Control and Validation, Operational Support and Analysis, and Service Offerings and Agreements).
People learn differently, so we use a variety of methods to teach concepts throughout the course. In addition to exam preparation and practice quizzes, you'll engage in round-table discussions, group exercises, and games designed to give practical context to the concepts. We take this approach not only because it's more interesting and fun than simply memorizing vocabulary, but because it works.
However, when it comes to the IT field, getting your ITIL certification is considered to be a very low-risk effort, and many will tell you that you’d be doing yourself a huge disservice to write it off. Certified ITIL professionals are a highly sought-after commodity, and the job market is stable enough where an ITIL v3 certification in any of the higher levels will be in demand for quite a long time.
Don't let the scope of ITIL scare you away from the overall value afforded by this comprehensive lifecycle for IT services. The ITIL framework gives companies the structure and discipline required to design, develop, deliver and manage new or improved services in a timely manner and, most importantly, on a budget. Before ITIL, a lack of service management discipline and expertise led many IT projects to suffer budget overruns, veer off course or fail outright due to scope-creep, mismanagement and a lack of repeatable results. ITIL solves these problems quite nicely. In fact, ITIL is widely regarded as the pre-eminent standard for IT service management frameworks.
While ITIL addresses in depth the various aspects of service management, it does not address enterprise architecture in such depth. Many of the shortcomings in the implementation of ITIL do not necessarily come about because of flaws in the design or implementation of the service management aspects of the business, but rather the wider architectural framework in which the business is situated. Because of its primary focus on service management, ITIL has limited utility in managing poorly designed enterprise architectures, or how to feed back into the design of the enterprise architecture.
ITSM is regarded by the application owners as the recovery of the IT infrastructure used to deliver IT services, but as of 2009 many businesses practice the much further-reaching process of business continuity planning (BCP), to ensure that the whole end-to-end business process can continue should a serious incident occur (at primary support level).
ITSM is regarded by the application owners as the recovery of the IT infrastructure used to deliver IT services, but as of 2009 many businesses practice the much further-reaching process of business continuity planning (BCP), to ensure that the whole end-to-end business process can continue should a serious incident occur (at primary support level).
However, ITIL certification is different. Having an ITIL certification doesn’t make us an ‘expert’ for any specific skill set. As you might already be aware, ITIL is a set of best practices and is descriptive in nature. Hence an ITIL certification isn’t about doing your job, but merely about knowing the ITIL principles. In fact, that’s precisely the reason why AXELOS have now added the ITIL Practitioner level which makes it mandatory for IT folks to apply their theoretical knowledge in practice. 
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