John Towsley’s extensive experience in the IT education marketplace has made him a perfect fit for teaching the ITIL Foundation Certification. He is of course ITIL certified himself, and knows exactly what it takes to find success in the IT Service Management field. Currently the CEO for B Wyze Holdings Inc., John’s experience and knowledge is invaluable. In the past, John established and operated his own multi-site IT education & consulting business in Canada and the US, and he brings this experience to you through the incredible content he provides for the Thought Rock Library.
Without any question, InfoSec has the most gifted individual instructors. Our instructor for this class was both an excellent educator and a premier/world class security expert. He was able to clearly explain and impart to the students, the most complicated security techniques I have ever heard of or imagined. I simply can not find the words to recommend him and Infosec security training more highly.
Ed is a 30-year-plus veteran of the computing industry, who has worked as a programmer, a technical manager, a classroom instructor, a network consultant and a technical evangelist for companies that include Burroughs, Schlumberger, Novell, IBM/Tivoli and NetQoS. He has written for numerous publications, including Tom's IT Pro, and is the author of more than 140 computing books on information security, web markup languages and development tools, and Windows operating systems.
The aim of the SDLC process is product-related. Its goal is to create a product that is high-quality, effective, and cost-efficient. After the product is developed, the SDLC maps the implementation of the software into a live environment. The general methodology of the SDLC typically consists of analysis (of both design and specific requirements), construction, testing, release, and then, maintenance. As you can see, the focus is on the software or product. The SDLC is most commonly implemented using an Agile or Waterfall approach.
A basic goal of security management is to ensure adequate information security. The primary goal of information security, in turn, is to protect information assets against risks, and thus to maintain their value to the organization. This is commonly expressed in terms of ensuring their confidentiality, integrity and availability, along with related properties or goals such as authenticity, accountability, non-repudiation and reliability.

ITIL® is a registered trade mark of AXELOS Limited, used under permission of AXELOS Limited. All rights reserved. The Swirl logo™ is a trade mark of AXELOS Limited, used under permission of AXELOS Limited. All rights reserved. IT Infrastructure Library® is a registered trade mark of AXELOS Limited, used under permission of AXELOS Limited. All rights reserved. The ITIL® Accredited Training Organization logo is a trade mark of AXELOS Limited, used under permission of AXELOS Limited. All rights reserved.
However, increasingly certifications (or rather ITIL certification) and training programs are becoming a ‘thing to add in your resume’, and not delivering the value they are supposed to bring. During my casual conversations at events and meet-ups, a common underlying theme has been about the mismatch between the performance of people (with certifications) and the knowledge they have gained from those certifications.
However, when it comes to the IT field, getting your ITIL certification is considered to be a very low-risk effort, and many will tell you that you’d be doing yourself a huge disservice to write it off. Certified ITIL professionals are a highly sought-after commodity, and the job market is stable enough where an ITIL v3 certification in any of the higher levels will be in demand for quite a long time.
The ‘Information Technology Infrastructure Library (ITIL)’ is a set of ITSM practices utilized by some of the most high-profile organizations in the world, including HSBC, IBM and even NASA. Originally released as a series of books, ITIL was designed to standardize the procedures for good IT management, helping businesses to avoid the most common pitfalls in order to deliver the best quality services possible.
All of our courseware is reviewed multiple times a year to ensure it's up to date, in line with best practice standards, and effective! We incorporate feedback from students to constantly improve our course books, in-class activities, and (sorry) homework. The goal is to provide you with the tools to not only get you through class and pass the exam, but also to have a reliable reference when you get back to the office.
Be aware that ITIL uses a credit system for the Foundation through Expert levels, in which each certification earns a certain number of credits. Ultimately, a total of 22 credits is required to achieve ITIL Expert certification. (The ITIL Master has its own set of requirements, which you'll read about shortly). The following graphic shows the structure of that certification scheme and its corresponding credits.
You have to submit your application to become a Master, and if your application is accepted, you will be required to submit a proposal. If this is successful, you will be required to submit a work package. The final stage of the Master scheme consists of an interview with a panel of assessors and, if successful, you will be granted ITIL Master certification. 
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