ITIL Intermediate Level, which scores a candidate with 15 or 16 credits, is open to those who have already passed the ITIL Foundation exam and have completed an accredited training course. The intermediate level includes two paths: Service Lifecycle, with five examinations (Service Strategy, Service Design, Service Transition, Service Operation, and Continual Service Improvement); and Service Capability, with four examinations (Planning Protection and Optimization, Release Control and Validation, Operational Support and Analysis, and Service Offerings and Agreements).

For years now, ITIL (formerly known as the IT Infrastructure Library) has remained the cornerstone and industry-standard best practice framework for supporting, managing and aligning IT Service Management with the needs of the business. Trademarked by AXELOS, ITIL acts as a governing agent for IT, and uses the ITIL Service Lifecycle to map the entire journey from customer needs and requirements all the way through continual improvement of services.
In a 2004 survey designed by Noel Bruton (author of "How to Manage the IT Helpdesk" and "Managing the IT Services Process"), organizations adopting ITIL were asked to relate their actual experiences in having implemented ITIL. Seventy-seven percent of survey respondents either agreed or strongly agreed that "ITIL does not have all the answers". ITIL proponents accept this, citing ITIL's stated intention to be non-prescriptive, expecting organizations to engage ITIL processes with existing process models. Bruton notes that the claim to non-prescriptiveness must be, at best, one of scale rather than absolute intention, for the very description of a certain set of processes is in itself a form of prescription.[72]

A summary of changes has been published by the UK Government. In line with the 2007 edition, the 2011 edition consists of five core publications – Service Strategy, Service Design, Service Transition, Service Operation, and Continual Service Improvement. ITIL 2011 is an update to the ITIL framework that addresses significant additional guidance with the definition of formal processes which were previously implied but not identified, as well as correction of errors and inconsistencies.
Organizations need both approaches. If ITIL best practices aren’t integrated into the SDLC, and the reverse as well, then development can become siloed. Software developers are most concerned with speed and innovation and operational functions are focused on governance and stability. Without ITIL and SDLC integration, businesses are more likely to experience issues like bottlenecks, the proper resources being unavailable when development requires them, and inaccurate information being collected. Additionally, inconsistent environments, manual deployment processes, subpar quality and testing, frequent outages, poor communication between IT silos, and failing SLAs can result. Any one of those issues will need significant time and expense of an organization’s IT resources to resolve.
However, ITIL certification is different. Having an ITIL certification doesn’t make us an ‘expert’ for any specific skill set. As you might already be aware, ITIL is a set of best practices and is descriptive in nature. Hence an ITIL certification isn’t about doing your job, but merely about knowing the ITIL principles. In fact, that’s precisely the reason why AXELOS have now added the ITIL Practitioner level which makes it mandatory for IT folks to apply their theoretical knowledge in practice. 
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